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Friday, September 30, 2011

U.S. Government: Education Over Immigration

On page A16 of the New York Times issue of September 29, 2011, two stories read side by side make an interesting point concerning the plight of American federalism. Campbell Robertson reports that Alabama won a ruling by a federal judge on the republic’s immigration law. Across the page, Mark Landler reports on Barak Obama’s visit to a local high school in Washington, D.C.

“Our country used to have the world’s largest proportion of young people with a college degree,” the president said. “We now rank 16th. I don’t like being 16th; I like being No. 1.” The last sentence in particular is revealing if one takes it in a broader sense. Barak Obama likes being No. 1. He likes being the center of it all—I suppose like New York City relishes being in the center of the universe. So it is of little consequence to the president that education is not among the federal government’s enumerated powers.  Even by going to a local school, Barak Obama instantiates the federal government’s encroaching nature, albeit for a good cause. He did not stop with education policy; he lapsed onto a parental role of sorts, saying, “I want all of you to set a goal to continue your education after you graduate.” Interlarding himself in the students’ families, he told the students how they should react to their parents. “Don’t give them a hard time when they ask you to turn off the video games, turn off the TV and do some homework,” he urged. Lest it be thought that this is simply some good-natured remarks by a father who undoubtedly cares about kids, it was the second day in a row that he had spoken at a school. In other words, the over-reach involves an opportunity cost.

It is not as though the president of the United States has a lack of things needing his attention within the enumerated powers of the U.S. Government. In fact, state officials have felt the need to step in to take up the slack concerning the U.S. Government’s failure to adequately enforce immigration law. But in what would be a twisted character flaw in a person, the federal government has fought such assistance while continuing to encroach in domains such as education. It is as if the person in charge of an association’s club house were resisting cleaning help by some of the members while going into their houses to take over their roles there. It is not as though the Obama administration were so consumed with visiting local schools that it would not have time or resources to resist state-level assistance on immigration. Moreover, it is not as though the administration were so focused to improve its own enforcement efforts that it didn’t have time or resources to involve itself in education and fight the states on immigration. The administration is making things far too difficult for itself as well as for others.

So while the president was acting as parent in chief at a local school, his administration lost a case in federal court against Alabama’s immigration law enforcing the federal law. Among other things, the Alabama law “nullifies any contracts entered into by an illegal immigrant.” Another section “forbids any transaction between an illegal immigrant and any division of the state,” and still another section “requires elementary and secondary schools to determine the immigration status of incoming students.” Nothing here violates or nullifies federal law; in fact, Alabama is helping said law. The motivation that resists help can and ought to be questioned. It is not as though states implementing federal law is unheard of. In the E.U., it is common for the states to be required to implement E.U. directives. If states cannot be trusted to implement federal law, why have a union at all? With respect to immigration, the orientation of every government in the American federal system ought to be to minimize illegal aliens within these United States. Fighting among ourselves, governmentally, only gives the law breakers more wiggle room to get through and live within the United States illegally—even enjoying benefits of citizenship without being citizens.

So rather than being educator in chief or parent in chief, the U.S. President ought to keep to his knitting—especially as there are some holes in it! Nor is he in a position to refuse help. Otherwise, the resultant encroaching nature of the general government will totally eviscerate American federalism with a one-size-fits-all imposition at the expense of the inherent diversity that exists in an empire-scale union.


Sources:

Campbell Robertson, “Alabama Wins in Ruling On Its Immigration Law,” New York Times, September 29, 2011. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/29/us/alabama-immigration-law-upheld.html

Mark Landler, “Obama Urges Students to Set Their Sights on College,” New York Times, September 29, 2011. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/29/us/politics/president-obama-urges-nations-students-to-set-sights-on-college.html